What My World's Like

read this: “chat history”

Sep
28

Technology is changing the ways we interact with and communicate with each other. It’s beautiful. It’s scary. It’s definitely interesting. If you’ve got five minutes, do yourself a favor and set aside five mintues to read Rebecca Armendariz’s “Chat History” available in GOOD magazine this month. It’s an incredibly touching story about a relationship and how Google keeps memories alive.

Read it here.

join the think tank!

Sep
25

The BMW Guggenheim Lab, currently featured in New York City, ends in three weeks. It’s been here since August 3rd, so I’m a little bothered it’s taken me so long to get over there. But…better late than never, right?

What is it? In a word, awesome. In a few, The BMW Guggenheim Lab is a mobile laboratory traveling to nine major cities worldwide over six years. Led by international, interdisciplinary teams of emerging talents in the areas of urbanism, architecture, art, design, science, technology, education, and sustainability, the Lab addresses issues of contemporary urban life through programs and public discourse. Its goal is the exploration of new ideas, experimentation, and ultimately the creation of forward-thinking solutions for city life.

It’s a pretty awesome idea and all the events they feature are free, prohibiting no socioeconomic group from attendance. Fun and free is always fantastic. It ends on October 16th, so head over while you can, before it travels to Berlin and Mumbai. In 2013, there will be an exhibition at the Guggenheim before completing two more 3-city cycles.

happy thoughts.

Sep
22

The rapper is Silas Zephania. The producer is Politiks. The combination is beautiful. They have an album together called War Begins Where Reason Ends available on iTunes for $9.99 or on bandcamp for £3 GBP, which is about $4.65 USD.

life’s lessons…

Sep
13

I’ve been listening to myself lately — honoring my own wisdom, listening to its whispers, feeling its tugs and trying to heed its advice. This is what I’m learning…

  • On music: It’s amazing. It’s awesome. It’s super powerful. It’s healing… It’s distracting. Sometimes. When I disconnect and listen to vocal-less music, I’m connected to myself and insights on life. It relaxes me and makes life a bit more otherworldly. Ambrose Akinmusire‘s When the Heart Emerges Glistening and Robert Glasper‘s Double Booked are soothing my spirit right now.
  • On desire: We’re not supposed to have everything we think we want. Or when we want it.
  • On life: Talents are our gifts — to us and to others. Burying them only shortchanges us and minimizes our contribution. Follow your bliss.
  • Practice love. Be loving. Don’t let pain, and subsequent anger, blind you to your love. You love because you are love and expressing it is the highest joy. So express it. Live it. Be love in motion.

teacher, don’t teach me no nonsense.

Sep
09

While hardly a frequent theater attendee, I appreciate greatness in various forms. I found it in FELA! the musical. Fela Kuti was quite an interesting person. Dedicated. Visionary. The show is on tour now. If it’s coming near you, give yourself the distinguished honor of seeing it. You will thank yourself.

Below is a video of him performing “Teacher Don’t Teach Me No Nonsense”. You may not know what he’s saying, but you feel the music and understand the vibe from the title.

What My World Sounds Like: “Open Mind”

Sep
07


The Robert Glasper Experiment


The beauty of the iTunes shuffle feature is discovering music you’ve owned and forgotten about and being catapulted back into that “I love this song!” feel good space. Thanks, Apple.

Tonight I shuffled upon a little reminder about life, and I’m grateful for it. Please enjoy this selection, “Open Mind”, from The Robert Glasper Experiment, composed of pianist Robert Glasper, bassist Derrick Hodge, drummer Chris Dave and keyboardist/saxophonist Casey Benjamin. As you listen, remember, it is experimental.

[audio:http://www.whatmyworldslike.com/audio/openmind.mp3]
The Robert Glasper Experiment – “Open Mind” featuring Bilal

“All that we are is a result of what we have thought. It is founded on our thoughts. It is made up of our thoughts.”

“As a man thinks, he is.”

Photo credit: Jati Lindsey

the mayonniase jar

Sep
01

My friend, Charles, sent me this story this morning. Apparently it’s been making its rounds on the Internet for a few years, but it made me smile and will hopefully do the same for you.


When things in your life seem, almost too much to handle…
When 24 hours in a day is not enough…
Remember the mayonnaise jar and two cups of coffee.

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, wordlessly, He picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls.

He then asked the students, if the jar was full.
They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls.

He then asked the students again if the jar was full.
They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else.

He asked once more if the jar was full.
The students responded with a unanimous ‘yes’.

The professor then produced two cups of coffee from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar, effectively filling the empty space between the sand.

The students laughed.

“Now,” said the professor, as the laughter subsided, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life.
The golf balls are the important things – family, children, health, passions.

Things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, house, and car.

The sand is everything else – the small stuff.

If you put the sand into the jar first, there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls.
The same goes for life.

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

So…

Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness.
Play with your children.
Take time to get medical checkups.
Take your partner out to dinner.

There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal.

Take care of the golf balls first – the things that really matter.
Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.”

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the coffee represented.

The professor smiled.

“I’m glad you asked. It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of cups of coffee with a friend.”