What My World's Like

Convention of those wounded in love

Mar
10

Originally published on December 13, 2009
promulgated by Paulo Coelho

Paulo-coelho-quote-going-forward

General provisions:

A. Whereas the saying “all is fair in love and war” is absolutely correct;

B. Whereas for war we have the Geneva Convention, approved on 22 August 1864, which provides for those wounded in the battle field, but until now no convention has been signed concerning those wounded in love, who are far greater in number;

It is hereby decreed that:

Article 1. All lovers, of any sex, are alerted that love, besides being a blessing, is also something extremely dangerous, unpredictable and capable of causing serious damage. Consequently, anyone planning to love should be aware that they are exposing their body and soul to various types of wounds, and that they shall not be able to blame their partner at any moment, since the risk is the same for both.

Article 2. Once struck by a stray arrow fired from Cupid’s bow, they should immediately ask the archer to shoot the same arrow in the opposite direction, so as not to be afflicted by the wound known as “unrequited love”. Should Cupid refuse to perform such a gesture, the Convention now being promulgated demands that the wounded partner remove the arrow from his/her heart and throw it in the garbage. In order to guarantee this, those concerned should avoid telephone calls, messages over the Internet, sending flowers that are always returned, or each and every means of seduction, since these may yield results in the short run but always end up wrong after a while. The Convention decrees that the wounded person should immediately seek the company of other people and try to control the obsessive thought: “this person is worth fighting for”.

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Goodness in the blogosphere…

Aug
11

CHALLENGE: foresighted retrospection

Jul
27

walking-away

 

Nothing lasts forever. While we know this, how much do we keep it mind as we move through our daily lives?

Recently, I’ve been contemplating the gross disintegration and looming demise of one of my most impactful relationships to date. As useless as it often is, regret sometimes enters my mind and I wonder how much time was wasted trifling over the more frivolous details as opposed to enjoying and celebrating the great aspects of the relationship. But what if you could use regret–beforehand?

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Great words: reconsider heartache

Mar
27

love philadelphialove philadelphia

“If you believe yourself unfortunate, because you have “loved and lost,” perish the thought. One who has loved truly, can never lose entirely. Love is whimsical and temperamental. Its nature is ephemeral, and transitory. It comes when it pleases, and goes away without warning. Accept and enjoy it while it remains, but spend no time worrying about its departure. Worry will never bring it back.

Dismiss, also, the thought that love never comes but once. Love may come and go, times without number, but there are no two love experiences which affect one in just the same way. There may be, and there usually is, one love experience which leaves a deeper imprint on the heart than all the others, but all love experiences are beneficial, except to the person who becomes resentful and cynical when love makes its departure.

There should be no disappointment over love, and there would be none if people understood the difference between the emotions of love and sex. The major difference is that love is spiritual, while sex is biological. No experience, which touches the human heart with a spiritual force, can possibly be harmful, except through ignorance, or jealousy.

Love is, without question, life’s greatest experience.”

– Napoleon Hill, Think and Grow Rich

I truly believe that Hill’s words have the power to create a paradigm-shift that can free one from the pain of love ending. We so dearly cling to this illusion that much of the love we experience is supposed to last forever and that illusion is what causes so much of the hurt felt. Accept and enjoy what you have. Cherish what you had, and always look for — and find — the good: the pure moments of joy, comfort, pleasure, and learning.